How Can New Technologies Help Make Fashion More Sustainable?

Fashion’s environmental footprint is one of the largest of any industry in the world, although it’s nearly impossible to measure the true scope of its impact. (The oft-quoted stat that it’s the second most-polluting industry in the world has been disproven several times over.)

However, according to a 2018 report released by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, the apparel industry produces 20 percent of global water waste and 10 percent of global carbon emissions, while 85 percent of textiles — 21 billion tons — are sent to landfills each year. Consumers are purchasing more clothes, and keeping them for half as long, driven by fast fashion, fast marketing and a digitally driven thirst for newness.

And yet, while revenues increase when consumers buy more clothes, there is also evidence that implementing sustainable practises can actually increase profits. Allocating resources more efficiently, building better working conditions and using sustainable materials could boost margins by 1-2 percent by 2030, according to a 2017 report released by Global Fashion Agenda and Boston Consulting Group. When companies hold themselves accountable publicly, it can also create goodwill with consumers.

But how can the industry do better overall? That was the big question in a salon discussion at VOICES, BoF’s annual gathering for big thinkers in partnership with QIC Global Real Estate, held in November 2018. The group, populated with industry insiders leading the sustainability conversation, determined that fashion can make immediate changes by investing in biotech, sustainable packaging, air and climate and the circular economy.

When it comes to bioengineering fabrics — which some argue carry a lighter environmental impact than natural fabrics — the challenges come in scalability. How can substitutes for leather, for instance, be made easily available? As one participant noted, the industry “really survives on 10 fabrics,” many of which were developed hundreds of years ago. “Ten years is a blink of an eye in biotech,” one expert said.

In order to scale as quickly as the industry wants them to scale, the companies developing bioengineered materials — from biodegradable materials to lab-grown leather and synthetic diamonds — have raised hundreds of millions of dollars in hopes of meeting industry demand, even if consumer demand is currently minimal.

Source: https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/voices/how-can-new-technologies-help-make-fashion-more-sustainable

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HOW SUSTAINABILITY IN FASHION WENT FROM THE MARGINS TO THE MAINSTREAM

Banana Republic is plugging its vegan suede jackets. J. Crew’s Madewell brand is urging consumers to turn their “old jeans” into “new homes” through its denim recycling program. Even fast-fashion giants, such as H&M and Uniqlo, which by definition are the opposite of ethically sourced apparel, are touting organic collections or recycling initiatives. Nearly every apparel marketer is following consumer demand by leaping onto the green wagon.

“Sustainability used to be seen as a nice-to-have and a fringe trend, but now it’s a core differentiator and a way consumers are really deciding between brands,” says Lucie Greene, worldwide director of the Innovation Group and JWTIntelligence.com at Wunderman Thompson. New generations of buyers, specifically millennials and Gen Z, care more about the earth they’re poised to inherit and have adjusted their spending accordingly. Indeed, in a recent Nielsen survey, 81 percent of consumers said they felt strongly that companies should help improve the environment.

Of course, incorporating some type of environmentally friendly practices into a label could mean a variety of things. Some brands use recycled materials to produce their wares; others claim to recycle goods after they’ve been purchased. Uniqlo, for example, has a recycling drop-off bin at its stores for consumers to leave unwanted clothing. Other companies, like direct-to-consumer player Everlane, market radical transparency so shoppers know how goods are produced every step of the way. Sustainability can also mean ethical production, in which workers are treated fairly and paid well, and sourcing materials in an environmentally friendly way.

This lack of a clear definition of terms is proving both beneficial and burdensome for brands grappling with how to best market their environmental consciousness to consumers. Some have gotten in trouble for inauthenticity, or when common practices, like Burberry’s burning of excess goods last year, come to light on social media. Meanwhile, new apps for consumers provide brand ratings based on environmental impact, making it even more imperative for brands to get it right with their marketing messaging.

“It’s the Wild West out there right now,” says Paul Magel, president of the business applications and technology outsourcing division at CGS, a software company that works with retail clients. “Brands can tout what they want to tout. It’s not like there’s a government-mandated label that says ‘To use sustainable, it has to have these tenets.'”

From crunchy to conventional
Historically, brands that dabbled in environmentally friendly practices were considered crunchy and unconventional; in the ’60s and ’70s, the trend started to gain traction. Some brands, such as sportswear marketer Patagonia and womenswear label Eileen Fisher, have always incorporated green initiatives into their operations, but it was not until the early 2000s that green messaging filtered out into the mainstream, as mass market brands began to notice the potential benefits. In recent years, social campaigns like #fashionrevolution and #slowfashion, which encourage consumers to take a deeper look into how their clothes are made, have helped spread demand for more transparency.

Source: https://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/sustainability-fashion-mainstream/316828/

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Style By Zenith Exhibitions

Some exhibitors at the maiden edition of the ongoing Lagos “Style by Zenith” Fair say they have recorded high-powered sales pitch at the market, which has attracted over 200 exhibitors.
Excited about the huge sales, the exhibitors commended the organisers of the fair, Zenith Bank and Fashion One, for the well organised business environment.
The exhibitors told the News Agency of Nigeria in separate interviews on Sunday that they had been able to create enough awareness for their products.
To them, the fair has created a veritable platform to showcase their products without financial commitments.
In addition, Point of Sales machines were also given to each of the exhibitors to ensure seamless business transactions, which will be returned at the end of the fair.
NAN reports that the “Style by Zenith” Fair is designed to showcase products of fashion, media, automobile, food, accessories, music and art industry.
An exhibitor, Aisha Adoga, producer of “Hands Hair”, who came from Benin, lauded the bank’s initiative, which she noted had created some business connections for her within Lagos and beyond.
“I am giving it to the organisers of this fair, it is the first one and I pray they are able to continue in subsequent years because this will revive most businesses in Nigeria,” she said.
Another exhibitor, Mosunmola Oladunni, Managing Director, Sweet Look World Concept, offered 20 per cent discount on her products — wigs, hair extensions and makeup products.
Oladunni said: “We are grateful to Zenith Bank for this because we were not charged a dime for exhibiting our products here.
“They prepared the ground and tents ready for us to display our products and sell, it is a rare opportunity and we cannot thank them enough.”
Oladunni, who noted that the fair was well organised, urged the organisers to focus more on advertising the fair in subsequent editions.
She said adequate publicity in both print and television media would attract more visitors to the fair.
She said: “We really thank Zenith Bank and Fashion One for this but I feel they have not created enough publicity due to the turnout; the turnout would have been more than this.”
Also, Seyi Martins, Activation Supervisor with Dangote Group of Companies, expressed excitement over huge sales made since the commencement of the fair.
Martins expressed optimism to make more sales before the end of the fair and appreciated the organiser for such a fantastic opportunity to sell her products.
She said: “I am happy we are able to achieve good sales, we hope to be here again next year.”
Oyindamola Kuye said the organisers of the fair had gone extra mile to give back to the society and their customers by staging the fair.
For June Levi-Oguike, the Managing Director, A’ku Wellness and Beauty Ng, the fair had impacted her business positively as customers now have absolute confidence in associating with such reputable organisations.
Levi-Oguike said: “We are grateful for this because due to the exhibitors’ relationship with the organisers, our customers have built a huge confidence in us.
“Being an exhibitor in this fair has increased my Instagram followers tremendously; this is due to the credibility of the bank.”
NAN reports that the Fair, which commenced on December 29, will end with a musical concert late on December 30.
The musical concert will feature Mayorkun, Wande Coal and others.
The fair has so far attracted biggest players from the food, fashion, media, automobile, accessories, music and arts industries.
NAN.

Source: https://theeagleonline.com.ng/huge-sales-at-maiden-lagos-style-by-zenith-fair-excite-exhibitors/

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Recap: Miss Nigeria 2018

Chidinma Aaron on Sunday defeated 12 other finalists to win the 2018 Miss Nigeria beauty pageant crown.

Chidinma Aaron, Winner Miss Nigeria 2018

The contestants were Ntan Nton, Egede Lagele, Thomas Mseve, Ameh Munirah, Otunba Ifunaya, and Shitta Remilekun. Others are Tizhe Usa Miriam, Okudili Odinaka Doris, Agida Stephanie, Ugwu Ijeoma, Aaron Chidinma Leilani, and Dunu Chisom Olivia.

Ebuka Obi-Uchendu

The final five were Dunu Chisom, Ntan Sharon Nton, Ameh Munirah, Agida Stephanie and Aaron Chidinma Leilani. Dunu Chioma became the first runner-up, while Ameh became the second runner-up.

Ezinne Akudo

Chidinma Aaron who winner of the pageant will take home N3 million, a luxury apartment and an automobile. She takes over the crown from Mildred Ehiguese who won the 2017 edition.

Rita Dominic

 

Image Credits: Bella Naija

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David Lanre Mesan’s Masterclass: Business Strategy Through Partnership

David Messan, a business strategist, and investor held a masterclass in the 360 Creative Hub as part of our Fashion Business Series. The masterclass was an intimate, roundtable of 15 young entrepreneurs.

The topic centered around growing a successful business through partnerships.

He started by talking about the importance of vision and how important it is to have clarity in your business. And in addition to financial capital, the strength of people capital. For one to be able to get the right profit they need the right people.

To sell anything, talk about the benefits of your product. Copy a popular style and when you get customers slowly migrate into your personal style.

For a strategy to manifest, you need to know how to strike: never stop talking about your business, don’t be too humble to be stupid, learn to talk.

When things aren’t going well, learn to take a break and re-strategize but not quit. The customer should influence your strategies and your business model.

Part of a brand strategy is keeping imagery in mind. The brand logo should be simple, relative and memorable.

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Recap: GTBank Fashion Weekend

GTBank Fashion Weekend kicked off on Saturday with a slew of Masterclasses from top industry experts including Project Runway’s Mr. Jay and famed designer Dapper Dan.

Designers, both domestic and foreign all showcased in the runway with clothes ranging from edgy to soft to culturally relevant.

Designers included LaQuan Smith, David Tlale, Ituen Basi, Lanre Da Silva Ajayi.

Some pictures from the runway.

Adama Paris
Adama Paris
Gozel Green
Ituen Basi
Ituen Basi
Sukeina
Sukeina
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Yoanna ”Pepper” Chikezie: Building Your Business Online

What’s our story? Your story should be as personal as possible. To build a brand online you need;

– Purpose
– Authenticity
– Experience
– Transparency
– Focus

Visuals! Visuals!! Visuals!!!

– Visuals help define a brand’s identity and communicate the vision of the brand.
– Creates better experiences.
– Shows off details.
– Create visuals that are memorable.
– Get creative and think outside of the box.
– Be consistent.

Marketing Mix

Advertising
Direct marketing
Personal selling
Sales promotion
PR and publicity
Word of mouth
Visual merchandising
Packaging
Corporate identity
Exhibitions

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Oben Bate: Business Model Canvas

– A strategic management and lean startup template for developing new or existing business model.
– It gives you the structure of a business plan without the overhead.

Business Model Main Drivers
– Focus; Is the stripping away of so many pages of a traditional business plan.
– Flexibility; It’s a lot easier to tweak the model and try new things.
– Transparency; much easier to understand.

BMC Element
Key Partners
Key Activities
Costs
Key Resources
Channels
Revenue
Customers
Customer relationship
Value propsitiong

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Banwo Omobolanle: The Mechanics Of Branding

Branding in one word is perception. It is basically how people see you. Following this pattern, brand identity is how a business presents itself and want to be perceived by the customers.

Bolanle Omobolanle[/caption]

Be consistent when building a brand, and know your target. Your aim of branding is successful when people see you the way you want them to see you.

Branding encompasses name, logo, colour, shapes, ads, language and interaction with customers. A good branding creates trust, and will make people pay more.

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The Fundamentals Of Business Structuring

Mr Gbenga Totoyi, a human resource expert explained everything a startup need to know about business structuring.

He explained that human resources helps one do business without emotional distraction.

In an organisation, there should be:

Structure – are designated roles in a business which every employee fully understands.

Policies – are already-made decisions to cover all issues or problems that may arise in the company.

Processes – is the how and why your business functions.

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